“how to be a lazy millionaire how long does it take to be a millionaire”

Hey Tim, I just finished watching your How to make millions DVD. It was awesome, I have learned so much. The different strategies are a big help, I haven’t found mine but I’m tweaking all of the ones I seen in the DVD or getting idea’s from them. I wouldn’t waste 30+ hours of my life watching just some random DVD, this truly has been inspiring. -JRuark

The Penny Hoarder – The Penny Hoarder pays up to $800 (rarely), depending upon the number of page views you receive. The pay starts at $100 for 50,000 page views, so this isn’t a guaranteed paid article, but it can potentially be highly rewarding.

After protecting your idea, you can now test run it to see its workability and identify flaws. Test running your idea might require you to; give out free samples of your product, grant access to experts to scrutinize your idea or join a focus group. The end point of your test running should be to gather feed back and improve or proceed with the idea. If the product is not yours, you will still need to test the market with it. Nobody wants to be stuck with a dying product.

When I say big things, I mean building or growing a business from Instagram. Influencer marketing is a huge business and there are tons of people out there making 6-7 figures solely from their social media following. Stone happens to be one of them.

What motivates me is thinking about all the people with seemingly successful businesses who, in my humble opinion, are far less qualified and competent than me. More important than anything else, these people take action. I’m learning to do the same.

there’s a fairly important flaw in your thinking here. And that is (correct me if I’m wrong) that you can contribute 15% of your gross pay to your 401k, up to a maximum of $15,500, but you can’t contribute the maximum unless it represents 15% of your pay. To do that, you’d need to be grossing $100,000, hardly a common salary for a a 20-year-old.

Well I know you have to be focus if you want to become https://youtu.be/PqKdLDXw7_A I am working on my second million, I made my first million in real estate! Goggle (Million Dollar Leases) and you can learn how to make your first million also!!

Listverse – Listverse pays $100 for each accepted post. The article must be a list, it must be at least 1,500 words and you must include at least 10 things. Other than that, you can get pretty creative with it.

If you want to get in shape you want to find a coach who emulates the body that you want. You obviously don’t want to be coached my someone who is 400 lbs if you are trying to lean up and get down to 130 lbs.

So there you have it. You can pay them 138$. This money will pay the person that referred you, and the owner of the scam (Matt Lloyd). And in return, you will be free to scam others and convince them to join My Millionaire Mentor. Is that what you imagined making money on the internet would look like?

Of course, my battle buddy didn’t like this idea. When I told my soon-to-be-wife about the situation, she shut me down really fast. But, there’s even more bad news. Since I had already hinted to my mother that I would do it, I had to go back and tell her I changed my mind.

A Filipino version of Millionaire was broadcast from 2000 to 2002 by the government-sequestered Intercontinental Broadcasting Corporation, produced by Viva Television,[53][54] and was hosted by Christopher de Leon. On 23 May 2009, the show returned with a new home on TV5,[55] with Vic Sotto as the new host.[56][57] The show aired its season finale on 7 October 2012 to give way to another game show hosted by Sotto, The Million Peso Money Drop (the Philippine version of The Million Pound Drop Live created by Endemol). However, the show returned to the air on 15 September 2013 for a new season together with Pinoy Explorer and Wow Mali! Pa Rin after the cancellation of the talent show Talentadong Pinoy (which would be revived just one year later).

A little long winded but just stay with me… My wife and I came to the US (to a small farm community in northern CA) as an immigrant 35yrs ago with 3 young kids (1yr, 2yr, 3yr olds), no English speaking skills, just a 3rd world high school education (which is probably equivalent to an 8th grade education here), no marketable skills, and just enough money for the plane ticket here and a 4yr old car when we got here. We first stayed with my sister in law and her husband for about 4 months while my wife and I worked in the fields in the summer harvesting fruit. After scrimping and saving we found our own old and broken down rental out in a peach orchard – it was the only one we could afford that would allow us to save. We continued working in the fields each summer thereafter and, as our 3 children grew , they helped working in the fields on the weekends and summers. Each child started helping out at about the age of 5 yrs old, so we could increase our earnings. The younger ones would play in the field where we worked. The farmers didn’t care, so they let us bring our kids. Over time, we, all 5, would work in the summers harvesting fruit and getting paid for each box filled. We were the slowest among the workers and filled the fewest boxes, but we persevered summer after summer. Then about 4-5 yrs after arriving in the US I got a farm job for the off season but on days it would rain, I didn’t have any work at all, so no pay. We never had health insurance so we tried hard to stay healthy. But at least I was able to earn some more money in addition to the summer earnings. So there we were, about 4-5 yrs after arriving, working in the fields, I made minimum wage with my farm job and my young family making a combined of less than minimum wage in the summer (remember how I said we got paid piece work and filled the fewest boxes?) – essentially, one min wage job and another 1/2 min wage job. But we persevered. Our kids would start working weekends at the start of summer and miss the 1st 2 weeks of school at the start just to get that extra income before the summer came to a close each year. But we all pulled together, saved for enough of a down pmt on a small house in town so we could afford the mortgage pmt and still be able to save. We splurged here and there (eating out a few times a year, buying a few nice things and keeping them FOREVER (new TV, new car, new furniture, new appliances), new clothes for school each year (never the trendy ones though – they cost too much – the kids knew how hard it was to earn a buck so they were happy for just the new clothes even if they weren’t trendy). Needless to say, we didn’t 1) buy morning coffees, 2) go out to lunch, 3) take vacations, 4) Waste stuff only to have to buy a replacement, 4) waste money on junk food, only the nutritional basics (we just couldn’t afford to do that AND save some for when there was no work due to rain). We ran into some medical problems, needing a few surgeries that ended up costing as much as a new car each time. But we needed it, didn’t have insurance, and had the savings so we had to pay. But we still persevered. We lived simply and saved simply. We didn’t get into investing in anything other than CD’s. I couldn’t even begin to understand that stock stuff so I avoided it. This continued for over a decade. Then my kids were in high school and got jobs at fast food so they made min wage – a step up from the field work and we saved their earnings as well. They would work 2 jobs in the summer – fields during the day and fast food during the evening/night – it was tough but it was only for the summer. As time went on, our WHOLE FAMILY COMBINED, FINALLY STARTED EARNING maybe about 2/3 of what an elementary school teacher earned (my uncle was one and I remember him alone earning more than our whole family earned). But we persevered. While my kids were in high school, we saved and eventually bought a bigger and nicer house in a nicer neighborhood and eventually paid it off. I still made min wage, wife worked doing seasonal work, kids help on weekends/summers. My kids went to a local community college and drove from home each day – the traditional going away to college was WAY TOO EXPENSIVE. All 3 still worked weekends fast food and both, fast food and field work, during summers. I still earned min wage and my wife worked seasonal during the summers. With a few scholarships, financial aid, we were able to pay for college. They then transferred to a nearby university, still drove each day from home to college, while maintaining the weekend/summer work. Again, with a little from scholarship, some financial aid, and working ALOT we paid for their college. Upon finishing college, all 3 moved out to where the jobs were. I still worked min wage, my wife, seasonal work. But we saved and didn’t waste it and lived simple lives. We then bought a bigger house, paid cash, in a nicer neighbor hood (with doctors, dentists, and pharmacists as neighbors) but we still live the same, no reason to change lifestyles. We also have enough for retirement but we continue to work. My neighbors don’t believe I work in the fields. I don’t care, it’s not my job to make them believe. To make a long story even longer, my WHOLE point is that you can STILL DO IT EARNING MIN WAGE! You don’t have to go as extreme as we did but you CAN STILL DO SOMETHING TO GAIN WEALTH! People who will NEVER have any wealth will only focus on excuses and come up with ALL kinds of holes and weaknesses in my story. People who WILL generate wealth will see the same story and come away encouraged to do better.

Plus, putting money aside will help you resist the urge to splurge, says Tim Steffen, director of financial planning for Baird’s Private Wealth Management group. Otherwise, says Steffen, “you take a trip and buy a car and the next thing you know, $100,000 is gone.” Putting your windfall on ice will also help you avoid the temptation to start a business without a solid plan or invest in your brother-in-law’s llama farm.

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